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Ing. Pedro Pablo Delgado Martell
"In our kilobyte - one thousand twenty-four bytes."

Your kilobyte???? Ok, let's move on, there is no point.

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Re: (no subject)

Antony Stone
On Thursday 07 December 2017 at 20:43:52, Ing. Pedro Pablo Delgado Martell
wrote:

> "In our kilobyte - one thousand twenty-four bytes."
>
> Your kilobyte???? Ok, let's move on, there is no point.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilobyte

"In historical usage in some areas of information technology, particularly in
reference to digital memory capacity, kilobyte denotes 1024 (2^10) bytes. This
arises from the powers-of-two sizing common to memory circuit design. In this
context, the symbols K and KB are often used."

"The kilobyte has traditionally been used to refer to 1024 bytes (2^10 B), a
usage still common. The usage of the metric prefix kilo for binary multiples
arose as a convenience, because 1000 approximates 1024."

"The binary representation of 1024 bytes typically uses the symbol KB, with an
uppercase letter K. The B is often omitted in informal use. For example, a
processor with 65,536 bytes of cache memory might be said to have "64K" of
cache. In this convention, one thousand and twenty-four kilobytes (1024 KB) is
equal to one megabyte (1 MB), where 1 MB is 1024^2 bytes."

Hope that helps,


Antony.

--
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Re: (no subject)

Yuri Voinov
Antonio, enough.

I do not believe that no one here has a sense of humor. Are you serious
about discussing it with animal seriousness?


08.12.2017 1:48, Antony Stone пишет:

> On Thursday 07 December 2017 at 20:43:52, Ing. Pedro Pablo Delgado Martell
> wrote:
>
>> "In our kilobyte - one thousand twenty-four bytes."
>>
>> Your kilobyte???? Ok, let's move on, there is no point.
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilobyte
>
> "In historical usage in some areas of information technology, particularly in
> reference to digital memory capacity, kilobyte denotes 1024 (2^10) bytes. This
> arises from the powers-of-two sizing common to memory circuit design. In this
> context, the symbols K and KB are often used."
>
> "The kilobyte has traditionally been used to refer to 1024 bytes (2^10 B), a
> usage still common. The usage of the metric prefix kilo for binary multiples
> arose as a convenience, because 1000 approximates 1024."
>
> "The binary representation of 1024 bytes typically uses the symbol KB, with an
> uppercase letter K. The B is often omitted in informal use. For example, a
> processor with 65,536 bytes of cache memory might be said to have "64K" of
> cache. In this convention, one thousand and twenty-four kilobytes (1024 KB) is
> equal to one megabyte (1 MB), where 1 MB is 1024^2 bytes."
>
> Hope that helps,
>
>
> Antony.
>
--
"Some people, when confronted with a problem, think «I know, I'll use regular expressions.» Now they have two problems."
--Jamie Zawinsk

**************************
* C++: Bug to the future *
**************************



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Re: (no subject)

Antony Stone
On Thursday 07 December 2017 at 20:50:27, Yuri wrote:

> Antonio, enough.
>
> I do not believe that no one here has a sense of humor.

I think I agree with that sentence (although it's a little hard to be sure).

> Are you serious about discussing it with animal seriousness?

The question appeared to be asked seriously in the first place.  I apologise if
it was in fact a joke and I did not realise.

Antony.

> 08.12.2017 1:48, Antony Stone пишет:
> > On Thursday 07 December 2017 at 20:43:52, Ing. Pedro Pablo Delgado
> > Martell wrote:
> >> "In our kilobyte - one thousand twenty-four bytes."
> >>
> >> Your kilobyte???? Ok, let's move on, there is no point.
> >
> > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilobyte
> >
> > "In historical usage in some areas of information technology,
> > particularly in reference to digital memory capacity, kilobyte denotes
> > 1024 (2^10) bytes. This arises from the powers-of-two sizing common to
> > memory circuit design. In this context, the symbols K and KB are often
> > used."
> >
> > "The kilobyte has traditionally been used to refer to 1024 bytes (2^10
> > B), a usage still common. The usage of the metric prefix kilo for binary
> > multiples arose as a convenience, because 1000 approximates 1024."
> >
> > "The binary representation of 1024 bytes typically uses the symbol KB,
> > with an uppercase letter K. The B is often omitted in informal use. For
> > example, a processor with 65,536 bytes of cache memory might be said to
> > have "64K" of cache. In this convention, one thousand and twenty-four
> > kilobytes (1024 KB) is equal to one megabyte (1 MB), where 1 MB is
> > 1024^2 bytes."
> >
> > Hope that helps,
> >
> >
> > Antony.

--
#define SIX 1+5
#define NINE 8+1

int main() {
    printf("%d\n", SIX * NINE);
}
        - thanks to ECB for bringing this to my attention

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